Wednesday, March 11, 2009

This is a Niddy-Noddy! (And some more yarn, of course ...)

Thank you for your encouraging comments on my first spinning attempts!

As I realized that the kitchen chairs could not permanently be occupied as yarn winders, I decided to make a Niddy-noddy myself with some spare wood I found in the barn - I know it won't exactly win a prize for best design, but it is at least doing its job ...

(I wonder where that funny word "Niddy-noddy" comes from - does anyone have an idea?)



This time I tried to do some really soft yarns as well (above) -

and below you can see that I've started knitting the earlier ones, blending them with commercial yarns, in order to do some kind of a vest or slipover.

8 comments:

LOVE STITCHING RED said...

I like your knitted bits - the colours will make a great waistcoat and so warm!

ritarenata said...

das sind ja gestrickte whatiffing-stücke. ein wahnsinn bist du.
verrückt-geniale-garne hast du mit soooo "freude" hergestellt.
ich bin total begeistert.
rita

Totty Teabag said...

You are learning so quickly; you really have an aptitude for spinning....I shall think of you now as Rapunzel...

Elizabeth said...

What a beautiful colours. Your experiment is really succesful.

paulahewitt said...

oooh! so that's what a niddy noddy is! i agree with Totty - i think you have an aptitude for this.

Anneli/Bockfilz said...

Thanks to all of you, girls - it's such a joy to read your comments!
I think you always learn those things fast, which fascinates you and boosts your imagination - although, when it comes to spinning, I'm well aware of that it takes time and much practising before you can really spin that perfect yarn ...
Love from "Rapunzel"
(I do have long hair - but those brave knights willing to climb the tower are quite scarce here ...)

Cecile said...

THank you for the explanation, I don't even know how it's called in French, so Niddy-Noddy would be fine I guess !

Anneli/Bockfilz said...

Hi Cecile - thank you for commenting! I've found out that there is a German word for it: "Nicker" (found it in an old spinning book) - it's actually an ancient tool, which was used with the spinning wheel ages ago in Germany as well, but obviously almost forgotten now.